Figuring Stuff Out

Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

What’s an ISO?

Posted by Mike on March 18, 2007

If you’ve been looking at the distro’s that I mentioned, and have gotten to the download page, you might be asking yourself this very question. You see installing an operating system is not the same as installing an application, there’s a little more to it. This might seem daunting, and figuring out what to do with an ISO might not seem worth the bother, but persevere and you’ll find that it’s really not that tough.

An .iso is a file type that contains all the information to burn an installation CD. Once you’ve jumped through the hoops of getting it properly burned it will be the equivalent of a disk that would come in a box from a store, so that all you have to do is drop it in the tray and get going (almost). Sadly there are a couple steps that you need to take first, they aren’t tough but I’ll try to save you a little time and walk you through it.

First off you’re going to need to get the file. To do this go to the download page of the distro you want (I’ll use Ubuntu for now but the process is pretty similar for every distro) and select the version number that you want and that will work with your computer. There’s an importantChoosing the nearest Download site one point, Linux is not designed to be limited to just one type of cpu. So if you are running something other than a PC you aren’t out of luck. Long-time Mac users can get versions for power pc chips and newer Mac users just use thchoosing the specific archecturee same version as a PC person. If you are using PC bought in the last five years or a Mac with Intel inside you are going to want the generic 386 version. To get this you will want to click on the download link from the country that you want to download in (see screenshot to the left), and than download the desktop i-386 .iso link (see the other screenshot to the right). At this point you can decide to do a normal file download or use bittorrent. If you have a program for downloading torrents take that option, it will be faster for you, easier on the server of the host organization, and finally allow you to use bittorrent for a legitimate purpose (who knew?).

The above is one of those stages where you will need to take a little responsibility for yourself. If you try to install an improper version of the operating system on your computer things might get a little ugly (most likely nothing at all will happen, but you never know). I’m not going to go into details about that, but if you are a windows user you can head into you control panel and then to the system icon and it will tell you the basics about your computer.

Once you have the .iso on your computer the next step is to get it burned onto a disk. Sadly you can’t just slap it straight on to the disk and going, the iso has to be burned as a disk image. Some burning suites do this out of the box but if you don’t have the ability to “burn a disk image” you’ll need to get yourself app to do so.   If you are running windows, this is a free iso burner and instructions on how to use it, if you work in OS X it seems you can just use the included disk utility (perhaps Mac users can suggest some freeware/dedicated alternatives).  Once you have your ISO burned you’re technically ready to get up and going in installing your shiny new OS.

I’ll talk about partitioning and booting your computer from a disk in my next message.  For now I would suggest that you concentrate on backing up everything that you don’t want to lost should things go wrong (as they definitely can) and thinking about how you want to use your computer going forward (ie. do you want to give up on your current OS or do you want to use Linux alongside it).

Posted in Linux, Mac, open source, Operating Systems, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Launchy!

Posted by Mike on February 26, 2007

Hello,

Still working on a post about my Linux server project but I thought I would fill the time by describing a neat little app for windows that some of you may like, Launchy. (download it here) It’s an open source app (meaning you can get it and run it for free, and fool around with the code if you feel so inclined) that allows you to access all kinds of functionality on your (windows) computer with a few key strokes.

After you install Launchy it scans your start menu (and any other drives or folders you would like it to) and creates an index that allows you to quickly open up applications simply by pressing the ‘alt’ and ‘space’ keys at the same time and typing in what you want. I’m putting together a quick demo movie that will go up soonish. What’s really cool is that it learns what you want the more you use it, so now all I have to do is type the letter ‘f’ and I can open up firefox. If you are reasonably familiar with, and have a somewhat organized, file structure you can also quickly work your way into the target folder that you would otherwise have to click through lots of intervening screens in Explorer to get to. It even lets you do calculations or launch searches in various web directories amongst other things.

launchy in action

For each individual task this really doesn’t represent a super big savings in time, and if you don’t want to take the time to learn how to use it it’s really not a big deal. But I must say that I like being able to get to nearly anything on my computer without having to take my hands off the key board (that mouse is just soooooo far away, seriously, I’m looking at it right now off about a foot to my right and dreading the idea of having to reach over there to press publish in a few minutes ). It’s actually vaguely like a return to the command line, although you are still accessing it through a pretty GUI.

Oh well, back to work I suppose…

Update – If you want to try a similar piece of software for the Mac that looks even slicker (and is also free), Quicksilver seems to be the way to go.

Posted in application, command line, Mac, Operating Systems, Windows | 1 Comment »

Command Line Woes

Posted by Mike on February 19, 2007

The project I’m currently working on is turning the old pentium III that I grabbed from my parents into a webserver using Ubuntu’s server distribution. I’m a big fan of using what’s shiny and new – as long as you forget about the 6 year old computer – so I’m using 6.10 Edgy Eft (they sure do have cute names). Perhaps the defining feature of ubuntu server (at least from my perspective) is that it has no GUI (graphical user interface for those not in the know) so absolutely everything I want to do has to be negotiated from the command line. I’ve had to go into the command prompt in Windows to do really simple things a few times before, and I fooled around with a few desktop distributions of Linux before I came up with this latest hare-brained scheme, so I have a little bit of experience communicating with a computer in text form. The last time I worked in an exclusively command line environment though, was DOS in the early 90’s on my Dad’s 386, and I only really knew enough to start up games.

The command line is an interesting beast, some people seem to swear by it while others argue that in most cases it is unnecessary (and that includes some certified computer geeks). I think I’m going to wind up coming down somewhere in the middle. I made early attempts at setting up my pIII as a web server using the GUI version of Ubuntu and Suse, but due to the system’s limitations I generally wound up smasing into a wall with the programs or somehow breaking the GUI. Since I switched over to the server, the only mistakes have been the result of my misunderstandings, which generally stem from tyring to use tutorials I find on the web to closely (I’ll explain that more in a later post). I think perhaps I’m starting to get a slightly better handle on how things work and have taken out what appears to be a very helpful book for a person in my situation from the library, those techie books sure aren’t cheap.

I doubt I’ll ever fully qualify as a true command line geek, but hopefully this experience will at least enable me to gain a slightly better understanding just what’s going on ‘under the hood.’

Posted in command line, Linux, Windows | 6 Comments »