Figuring Stuff Out

Archive for the ‘Mac’ Category

This is so cool

Posted by Mike on March 21, 2007

OK I saw this and am now actually a little bit jealous of Mac owners.  It seems that there is a nifty little OS X app called proximity.  Proximity is a free download for your Mac that can sense when a designated bluetooth device (assuming you have bluetooth in your computer) comes into ‘proximity’ of the computer.  The more inventive of you have already started dreaming up cool things that this application could be used to do.  Unfortunately, for the less tech savvy of you out there, you need to be able to write apple scripts to be able to set up the cool proximity based actions that your computer can do.  Luckily my favorite blog has linked to a smart generous fellow who created a few cool scripts for you to plug into the app.  Some examples:

(quoted from http://hollington.ca/technocrat/?p=44)
When the Bluetooth Device enters range:

  • Deactivate the Screen Saver Password.
  • Deactivate the Screen Saver.
  • Reconnect the phone to the OS X Address Book
  • Sync the phone using iSync

When the Bluetooth Device leaves range:

  • Activate the Screen Saver Password.
  • Activate the Screen Saver.

There are clearly all kinds of other worthwhile things those of you with scripting skills might be able to come up with, if you do (or if I come across and others)  feel free to toss a description and a link in the comments so that others can benefit.

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Posted in application, Mac, Operating Systems | Leave a Comment »

What’s an ISO?

Posted by Mike on March 18, 2007

If you’ve been looking at the distro’s that I mentioned, and have gotten to the download page, you might be asking yourself this very question. You see installing an operating system is not the same as installing an application, there’s a little more to it. This might seem daunting, and figuring out what to do with an ISO might not seem worth the bother, but persevere and you’ll find that it’s really not that tough.

An .iso is a file type that contains all the information to burn an installation CD. Once you’ve jumped through the hoops of getting it properly burned it will be the equivalent of a disk that would come in a box from a store, so that all you have to do is drop it in the tray and get going (almost). Sadly there are a couple steps that you need to take first, they aren’t tough but I’ll try to save you a little time and walk you through it.

First off you’re going to need to get the file. To do this go to the download page of the distro you want (I’ll use Ubuntu for now but the process is pretty similar for every distro) and select the version number that you want and that will work with your computer. There’s an importantChoosing the nearest Download site one point, Linux is not designed to be limited to just one type of cpu. So if you are running something other than a PC you aren’t out of luck. Long-time Mac users can get versions for power pc chips and newer Mac users just use thchoosing the specific archecturee same version as a PC person. If you are using PC bought in the last five years or a Mac with Intel inside you are going to want the generic 386 version. To get this you will want to click on the download link from the country that you want to download in (see screenshot to the left), and than download the desktop i-386 .iso link (see the other screenshot to the right). At this point you can decide to do a normal file download or use bittorrent. If you have a program for downloading torrents take that option, it will be faster for you, easier on the server of the host organization, and finally allow you to use bittorrent for a legitimate purpose (who knew?).

The above is one of those stages where you will need to take a little responsibility for yourself. If you try to install an improper version of the operating system on your computer things might get a little ugly (most likely nothing at all will happen, but you never know). I’m not going to go into details about that, but if you are a windows user you can head into you control panel and then to the system icon and it will tell you the basics about your computer.

Once you have the .iso on your computer the next step is to get it burned onto a disk. Sadly you can’t just slap it straight on to the disk and going, the iso has to be burned as a disk image. Some burning suites do this out of the box but if you don’t have the ability to “burn a disk image” you’ll need to get yourself app to do so.   If you are running windows, this is a free iso burner and instructions on how to use it, if you work in OS X it seems you can just use the included disk utility (perhaps Mac users can suggest some freeware/dedicated alternatives).  Once you have your ISO burned you’re technically ready to get up and going in installing your shiny new OS.

I’ll talk about partitioning and booting your computer from a disk in my next message.  For now I would suggest that you concentrate on backing up everything that you don’t want to lost should things go wrong (as they definitely can) and thinking about how you want to use your computer going forward (ie. do you want to give up on your current OS or do you want to use Linux alongside it).

Posted in Linux, Mac, open source, Operating Systems, Windows | Leave a Comment »

Launchy!

Posted by Mike on February 26, 2007

Hello,

Still working on a post about my Linux server project but I thought I would fill the time by describing a neat little app for windows that some of you may like, Launchy. (download it here) It’s an open source app (meaning you can get it and run it for free, and fool around with the code if you feel so inclined) that allows you to access all kinds of functionality on your (windows) computer with a few key strokes.

After you install Launchy it scans your start menu (and any other drives or folders you would like it to) and creates an index that allows you to quickly open up applications simply by pressing the ‘alt’ and ‘space’ keys at the same time and typing in what you want. I’m putting together a quick demo movie that will go up soonish. What’s really cool is that it learns what you want the more you use it, so now all I have to do is type the letter ‘f’ and I can open up firefox. If you are reasonably familiar with, and have a somewhat organized, file structure you can also quickly work your way into the target folder that you would otherwise have to click through lots of intervening screens in Explorer to get to. It even lets you do calculations or launch searches in various web directories amongst other things.

launchy in action

For each individual task this really doesn’t represent a super big savings in time, and if you don’t want to take the time to learn how to use it it’s really not a big deal. But I must say that I like being able to get to nearly anything on my computer without having to take my hands off the key board (that mouse is just soooooo far away, seriously, I’m looking at it right now off about a foot to my right and dreading the idea of having to reach over there to press publish in a few minutes ). It’s actually vaguely like a return to the command line, although you are still accessing it through a pretty GUI.

Oh well, back to work I suppose…

Update – If you want to try a similar piece of software for the Mac that looks even slicker (and is also free), Quicksilver seems to be the way to go.

Posted in application, command line, Mac, Operating Systems, Windows | 1 Comment »

Picking Apples

Posted by Mike on February 24, 2007

Man, I think coming up with clever titles (at least ones that I think are clever) is going to be the hardest part of maintaining this blog. This post is going to be a wrap up on the experimenting I did with getting Nancy’s MacBook running smoothly. I didn’t get to try all of the tips in the articles I linked to below (a lot of them really didn’t have much to do with Nancy’s problem, and the others involved paid products).

The first thing I did was clear Limewire off of her system, I’m not sure about the Mac version but it’s a system hog on Windows and there are torrent programs that have way better selections with far less bloat.old mac versus PC ad This led to an interesting quandary for me as I had never removed a program from a Mac before. I spent a good 15 minutes rooting around looking for the uninstall program and told Nancy that just dropping the program in the trash bin was not going to do it. After giving up and searching around on the Internet for a bit I discovered that, for the most part, Nancy was right. It seems to be the case that programs can be effectively erased by simply dropping them into the trash can. A quick spotlight search after doing so revealed that some related files were still hanging around in various places though, so I dropped them into the can as well. Perhaps you more advanced Mac users can tell me if I missed something, but if getting rid of programs is that simple colour me impressed.

Next up I tried the command line trick for forcing the computer to do the file system maintenance that Nancy normally misses when her computer is off at night (the instructions are here under the heading Save Disk Space. This involved a little bit of work in the terminal, but it was dead simple so even the most computer phobic of you should have no problem with it. There are instructions on the page for getting to your terminal and if you just type the command that they give you word for word everything should be fine (this article also mentioned that keeping the install file that you originally download will generally give you a proper uninstall program, I think that would make me feel more confident so I would recommend you put them all into a folder). Finally I went into the disk utility and had it repair the permissions (instructions can also be found at the above link).

Well that’s all I got done. Some of you have provided some really interesting thoughts on the matter already though. A few of you mentioned sad sad tales of logic boards and hard drives going toast. Perhaps Nancy I will try to convince her to take her baby into a Mac service store to get it checked out soon (she’s in study mode for a research methods exam right now, so I doubt she’ll be making the trip before Monday afternoon). There was also a very interesting point made about the relative ease of reformatting a hard drive in OS X with the ‘archive and install‘ feature, think we’ll still make a backup on separate media of all the things she’s especially partial to, but it might not be a bad solution if she still has trouble.

I’m not sure if Nancy has noticed any improvement or not (I keep meaning to ask and then forget) so perhaps she can let us know in a comment, if anyone else thinks I missed something obvious and/or major, I probably did, please feel free to let me know about it.

Update – There have been two pieces of software recommended in the comments section that both sound really good to me.  The first by Dan K was Monolingual which lets you clear off all of the many languages that OS X supports which will save you a lot of space with no noticable loss.  The other is Anacron recommended by MJ which runs drive system maintenence sweeps automactically (thereby allowing you to avoid the command line stuff I described).  These both seem like programs worth trying.  I’ll have a new post up about my current ‘big’ project in the next day or so…

Posted in command line, Mac, Operating Systems, troubleshooting | 4 Comments »

Lots to do

Posted by Mike on February 22, 2007

So I fooled around with Nancy’s Mac yesterday but I’ve got lots to do today for various projects so my follow up thoughts won’t go up until sometime this weekend. I’m still interested in any of your thoughts on other fixes that can be tried though. Have a good day everyone.

-Update- just came across this great little article on the Mac v PC debate I sort of skated across in the last post and thought I’d point to it.

Posted in Mac, Operating Systems, semi-structured thoughts | 3 Comments »

Biting the Apple

Posted by Mike on February 20, 2007

Well here it is, my first project. It’s kind of a mini-one, and it’s not actually for me (ack! more evidence that I might actually make a good librarian) but my friend Nancy (hmm, perhaps my claims to altruism were premature, although she will read this which will probably negate the negation of my altruism..) has been complaining that her Intel Macbook has been acting up as late. I’m not now, nor have I ever been, a Mac user, I’ve played around with the Imac at my school a bit, and I remember playing with a Mac one of my aunts had in the mid 90’s, but expert I am not.

I’ll give a brief description of Nancy’s troubles now, so that you all know what I’m getting myself into. The main symptom she has identified is that her Mac refuses to fully shut-down. It doesn’t happen all of the time, but it’s enough to be frustrating and we all know that the ‘hard-shutdown’ is not factory recommended. On top of this, she’s been noticing that things seem to have gotten sluggish in general with her new(ish) toy.

If you’ll allow me an aside, and let’s face it you have no choice in the matter, this strikes me as interesting when one takes into account the claims of OS X’s inherent superiority to Windows. Let’s be clear here, I’m not a Microsoft fan, XP has an enormous number of problems, requires all sorts of maintenance, is much more vulnerable to attack (although I think its market dominance makes it a much more worthwhile target), and is no where near as pretty as OS X (I’ve not used Vista at all so I can’t comment on it). It seems to me though that one of the reasons a lot of people buy Macs is because of the impression that they are easier to use and maintain than PC’s (think about the latest Mac commercial campaign if you don’t believe me). The fact of the matter is that all computers need maintenance, even the all mighty Mac, if they are going to run efficiently, just like they all need security to do so safely. That’s it, I’ve probably peeved off any random Mac Fanboys who happen to drop by this post (I’m pretty sure the Mac people I know are all reasonable enough to not tie any of their sense of self-worth to the brand of computer that they use), so I’ll put off more rambling on the Mac for another post.

With this in mind, I took to the mean streets of the Internet to see what tips and tricks there might be. As a side note, I’m still not sure how I’m going to present the various resources I want to present on this blog. For today I will do it in one long list with comments beside each, let me know what you think of this approach in the comments (I like comments)

First up is a series of three articles about maintaining the general health of your Mac. They seem pretty useful (I’ll do another post after I’ve actually tried these things), if a bit dated. A number of the suggestions rely on fairly expensive -from the point of view of a student anyway – pieces of software, which is a minus. Still, it was written for OS X and I’ll try all the freeware solutions and general stuff. In an interesting pre-note, I came across a link to a study published by Google people on failure in trends in hard-drives, in which they (and let’s face it, if they know about anything it’s hard-drives) basically poo-pooed one of the recommendations made in these articles. It seems that SMART (self monitoring facility) is really not a great indication of when a drive will fail (still it’s probably better than nothing and it’s free so I’ll probably wind up slapping it on Nancy’s system anyway).

This is not a tutorial so much as a recommendation for a little piece of software that, much like power toys for Windows, makes it easier to play with the settings on your Mac. Sadly, the link in the actual article is outdated and leads to nothing, but a quick Google search revealed that the product is still available free here (I have no idea if it’s Open Source, I doubt it but free as in beer is pretty sweet too). There’s not much I can say about these links in advance, but I’ll give me impressions about the tool in the follow up post that I’ve already promised (I actually caught the typo in this sentence, but I like that it makes me sound like a pirate so I’m leaving it in).

This next article is another short blurb that focuses on protecting users from potentially malicious widgets that they could unknowingly put on their dashboard. I’m not sure if Nancy has installed any widgets, but I’ll probably set it up because it will let me play with the automator app on the Mac and I like to play with things.

One more article from the Macobserver site. This one includes a bunch of short tips to pep up OS X (or keep it peppy). It sounds like Nancy already stuffed her book full of RAM, but some of the other recommendations look like they might be worth a shot.

In light of the last posting I made it seems only appropriate that I should take advantage of OS X’s having been build from UNIX to go into the command line and try some scripts that have been recommended on the above sites. These four articles represent a primer on interacting with the Console in OS X and, since I will be playing with someone else’s computer, I think it’s probably a good idea that I take a fairly close look at what’s included here (I promise I won’t do anything nuts Nancy).

This is set up like a FAQ but it has a section on OS X troubleshooting that looks like it might be useful (and will give me more stuff to do in the Command line, I’ll be careful).

This is yet another guide to fixing up the disk in OS X, I like to have lots of sources though (I guess that’s what comes from years and years of essay writing).

Sometimes bulletin boards have useful things to say (I’ve been learning this more and more while working on my Linux box) and this is a conversation about someone who sounds as though they are having a similar problem to Nancy. A couple kind souls have left comments that might help (although I am hoping that a disk format will not be neccesary).

Finally I have an interesting article that came up while I was Googleing Nancy’s problem. It seems that there was a bug in the MacBooks that was causing them to randomly shut down, Apple has released a patch so it will be worthwhile to ensure that she (along with you other Mac folks) have gotten this thing onto your computer, I would imagine it was automatically downloaded and installed but it’s always worth checking.

OK, that is the list as it stands. I’ll do some follow up after the fact. If any of you Mac experts have any tips, tricks, or warnings before I delve in I’d love to hear about them in the comments. Oh yeah, I guess seeing as this is the first post I’m making to an actual audience I should say welcome.

Posted in command line, Mac, open source, Operating Systems, troubleshooting | 3 Comments »